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Measles Vaccine, Singapore - Shim Clinic

Live measles Virus vaccine jab/shot/injection schedule, to vaccinate against measles virus to immunize against Measles at Shim Clinic in Singapore

A number of live, attenuated measles vaccines are currently available, either as monovalent vaccine or as measles-containing vaccine combinations with one or more of rubella (R), mumps (M) and varicella vaccines. The measles/ mumps/rubella (MMR) or measles/rubella (MR) vaccine is given in many countries instead of monovalent measles vaccine. The measles vaccines that are now internationally available are safe and effective and may be used interchangeably in immunization programmes. Every child should receive two doses of measles vaccine. The second dose may be given as early as 1 month following the first, depending on the local programmatic and epidemiological situation.

Special attention must be paid to all children and adolescent/young adult travellers who have not received two doses of measles vaccine. Measles is still common in many countries and travel in densely populated areas may favour transmission. For infants travelling to countries experiencing extensive measles transmission, a dose of vaccine may be given as early as 6 months of age. However, children who receive the first dose between 6 and 8 months of age should subsequently receive the two doses according to the national schedule. Older children or adults who did not receive the two lifetime doses should consider measles vaccination before travel.

Given the severe course of measles in patients with advanced HIV infection, measles vaccination should be routinely administered to potentially susceptible, asymptomatic HIV-positive children and adults. Measles vaccination may be considered even in individuals with symptomatic HIV infection, provided that they are not severely immunosuppressed. Where the risk of contracting measles infection is negligible, physicians who are able to monitor CD4 counts may prefer to delay the use of measles vaccine until CD4 counts are above 200. Following measles vaccination no increased risk of serious adverse events has been demonstrated in HIV-positive compared with HIV-negative children, although lower antibody levels may be found in the former group.


Latest News

Measles outbreak: Should your child be given the MMR vaccine as measles cases soar
Thu, 20 Sep 2018 22:12:00 +0800 | Daily Express - Health
MEASLES is making a resurgence throughout Europe, as cases of the once eradicated disease skyrocket amid anti-vaccination popularity. One of the best ways to combat the spread is to ensure your child is given the MMR vaccine. (Source: Daily Express - Health)

Measles: Is the MMR vaccine safe? Dr Ranj reveals how to avoid ‘severe consequences’
Thu, 20 Sep 2018 17:32:00 +0800 | Daily Express - Health
MEASLES is a highly infectious viral illness which can result in serious complications, including fatality. The MMR vaccine can prevent measles, mumps ad rubella, but is it safe? Dr Ranj Singh issued his advice on This Morning. (Source: Daily Express - Health)

Childhood vaccine uptake slumps in England
Wed, 19 Sep 2018 07:00:00 +0800 | OnMedica Latest News
MMR coverage at lowest level since 2011 Related items fromOnMedica Rapid rise in flu consultations putting strain on GPs Easter travellers warned over Europe measles outbreak Public Health Wales renews call for parents to take children for MMR jab GPs in catch-up campaign to target a million children with MMR Measles immunity fades sooner in babies of vaccinated mothers (Source: OnMedica Latest News)

Take-up of MMR vaccine falls for fourth year in a row in England
Tue, 18 Sep 2018 20:45:33 +0800 | Guardian Unlimited Science
Proportion of children being immunised down to 91.2% as experts warn of measles riskThe proportion of children in England getting immunised for measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) has fallen for the fourth year in a row, as uptake for a further nine out of the 12 routine vaccinations has dropped, figures show.Related:Resurgence of deadly measles blamed on low MMR vaccination ratesContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)

Healthcare cuts 'strongly linked' to the resurgence of measles
Wed, 12 Sep 2018 11:00:00 +0800 | EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases
(Bocconi University) Studies show that primary reason for the measles outbreak, affecting several European countries, is the decline in vaccination coverage, for which mainly the 'spread of anti-scientific theories' can be blamed. However, a new study in the European Journal of Public Health shows that cuts in public health expenditure also play an important role, with measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccination coverage decreasing 0.5 percentage points for each 1 percent expenditure cut (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)

How opposition to vaccines caused a measles outbreak in Europe
Sat, 08 Sep 2018 01:52:00 +0800 | CBC | Health
A measles outbreak in Europe this summer is due to a lack of immunization, according to the World Health Organization. Researchers say that Russian trolls posting misinformation on vaccines are part of the problem. (Source: CBC | Health)

Two Airplane Health Scares This Week Were Linked to People Returning From the Hajj in Mecca
Sat, 08 Sep 2018 00:47:49 +0800 | TIME: Health
A pair of airline health scares this week were related to the hajj pilgrimage in Mecca, officials say. Eleven people were treated at a New York City hospital after reports of sick passengers and crew on an Emirates flight from Dubai on Wednesday. The next day, a total of 12 passengers on two flights into Philadelphia International Airport showed flu-like symptoms. “Overall, the common thread is influenza A cases in returning Hajj pilgrims,” Centers for Disease and Control (CDC) spokesman Benjamin Haynes told TIME. The hajj, an annual pilgrimage for practicing Muslims, this year reportedly drew more than 2 million people to Mecca, Saudi Arabia. As with any event that involves large crowds in confined spaces, outbreaks of communicable diseases such as the flu are common at the ha...

Two Airplane Health Scares Last Week Were Linked to People Returning From the Hajj in Mecca
Sat, 08 Sep 2018 00:47:49 +0800 | TIME: Health
A pair of airline health scares last week were related to the hajj pilgrimage in Mecca, officials say. Eleven people were treated at a New York City hospital after reports of sick passengers and crew on an Emirates flight from Dubai on Wednesday. The next day, a total of 12 passengers on two flights into Philadelphia International Airport showed flu-like symptoms. “Overall, the common thread is influenza A cases in returning Hajj pilgrims,” Centers for Disease and Control (CDC) spokesman Benjamin Haynes told TIME. The hajj, an annual pilgrimage for practicing Muslims, this year reportedly drew more than 2 million people to Mecca, Saudi Arabia. As with any event that involves large crowds in confined spaces, outbreaks of communicable diseases such as the flu are common at the ha...

Passengers on 4 Southwest Flights May Have Been Exposed to Measles
Fri, 07 Sep 2018 23:37:33 +0800 | TIME: Health
A Texas resident sick with measles may have exposed passengers on four Southwest Airlines flights to the highly contagious virus, officials said. The individual took flights connecting through Houston’s Hobby Airport on Aug. 21 and 22, the Houston Health Department announced Thursday. The passenger was diagnosed with measles after traveling, a Southwest representative told TIME, but health department said the person was contagious at the time of the flights. Southwest is working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to notify passengers on four flights of the possible exposure, the airline said. These flights include Flight 5, from Dallas to Houston on Aug. 21; Flight 9, from Houston to Harlingen on Aug. 21; Flight 665, from Harlingen to Houston on Aug. 22; and Fl...

Recent measles case in Santa Monica sheds light on risk of outbreak
Thu, 30 Aug 2018 07:14:53 +0800 | UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences
The recent news about an international tourist with measles who visited Santa Monica raised anew concerns about the potential for an outbreak of the disease, which has been all but eradicated in the United States.Measles remains endemic in many parts of the world, including popular tourist destinations in parts of Western Europe, and travelers need to be aware of the risks posed by the highly contagious disease. In the Santa Monica case, the traveler had visited several restaurants and hotels in Santa Monica from Aug. 8-10.UCLA HealthDr. Deborah Lehman“Measles is one of the most contagious disease we have, and the communicability is so high,’’ said Dr.Deborah Lehman, a professor of clinical pediatrics at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at  UCLA and an expert in infectious disease...


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